Virginia elections put another state squarely in the energy-transition column

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享E&E News:The Democratic governor of Virginia’s attempts to join the cap-and-trade compact of 10 states had been thwarted by Republican lawmakers, who had controlled the General Assembly in Richmond. That roadblock no longer exists.Climate policy in the U.S. has closely tracked with Democratic state victories in recent years. In 2018, Democrats seized control of all three branches of state government in Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico and New York and added to their narrow legislative majorities in Washington state.In the following months, New Mexico, New York and Washington all passed legislation to eliminate emissions from power plants by midcentury. Colorado passed a series of reforms meant to green its power supply while Nevada boosted its requirements for renewable energy.Northam has indicated that he wants to follow in those state’s footsteps. In September, he issued an executive order setting renewable energy goals for the state. They included generating 30% of Virginia’s power from renewables by 2030 and all power from non-carbon emitting sources by 2050.But with Republicans controlling the General Assembly in Richmond, the order lacked the force of other states. One big question will be how Democrats approach Dominion Energy Inc., the state’s largest utility. Dominion has emerged as a flashpoint in Virginia politics in recent years.But Dominion has also signaled it is willing to substantially boost its investment in renewables. When Northam issued his executive order establishing renewable energy goals, the utility responded with a statement saying “challenge accepted” Dominion recently announced plans to invest $8 billion in offshore wind.More: Democratic sweep thrusts Va. into ambitious role on climate Virginia elections put another state squarely in the energy-transition columnlast_img

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