Vermont Yankee Study Identifies Major Environmental and Economic Benefits

first_imgVermont Yankee Study Identifies MajorEnvironmental and Economic BenefitsVermont Energy Partnership Urges Policy Makers andthe Public to Review Independent Expert’s FindingsMontpelier, VT/November 17, 2008 – An independent assessment of the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant finds that the facility provides major economic and environmental benefits to Vermont and that the consequences of closing it would be significant. In addition, the only potential solution to replace all or the vast majority of its power near term is to construct a combined cycle natural gas plant.The effects of such a plant and the loss of Vermont Yankee include:* Statewide average retail electric prices are estimated to increase by 19 to 39 percent.* Without Vermont Yankee’s power, carbon dioxide emissions, from all sources statewide, would likely increase by two million tons annually, a 100 fold or 10,000 percent increase.* Emissions of nitric oxide, a toxic substance which causes the weakening of the earth’s ozone layer, would increase by 550 tons, a twofold increase from current levels.* The potential costs to Vermonters stemming from the need for pollution allowances could exceed $60 million annually for carbon dioxide and $3 million for nitric oxide. These costs would be in addition to the retail price increases.* The loss of Vermont Yankee would deprive the Vermont Clean Energy Development Fund $4-$7 million per year.The study’s author is Dr. Howard Axelrod, president and founder of Energy Strategies, Inc. of Albany, New York. Dr. Axelrod has been a management consultant for over 25 years and has been engaged by a wide range of energy clients, state and federal regulatory agencies, and large industrial users of energy.Dr. Axelrod evaluated various alternatives to Vermont Yankee and the feasibility of having these power sources online by March 2012, when Vermont Yankee’s current license expires.With respect to renewable resources, Dr. Axelrod found, “There is no question that wind energy and other renewable resources will play a vital role in meeting Vermont’s growing energy needs. However, it is highly unrealistic to assume that between the end of 2009 when the NRC [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission] is expected to rule on the Vermont Yankee relicensing application, and 2012, when the original operating license expires, Vermont could add the necessary magnitude of renewable generation.”In fact, there are formidable challenges to bringing large amounts of renewable power online, especially near term. Dr. Axelrod’s study found the following.* Wind power. “To replace Vermont Yankee …. with an equivalent number of wind-derived electricity would require the installation of more than 1,500 wind generators. Given that the largest wind farms install only a few hundred generators, the addition of 1,500 generations with the associated transmission lines needed to connect to the Vermont network, 2012 is an unrealistic completion date.”* Solar. “The equivalent number of solar collectors (to replace Vermont Yankee) would require over 2,000 acres of dedicated space just for the solar collectors. To maximize exposure to the sun, an untold amount of land will have to be cleared in order to capture as much sun energy as possible.”* Wood. “The amount of wood and waste wood materials needed to produce the same amounts of electricity as from Vermont Yankee would exceed two million tons of bond-dry wood per year … a Vermont Yankee biofuel replacement would require over 200,000 acres of woodlands to be cultivated each year, which represents nearly five percent of Vermont total geographic space.”Dr. Axelrod does find, “There is one alternative to Vermont Yankee that might meet the tight time schedule, namely the installation of 620 MW (megawatts) of combined cycle gas turbines (CCGT).”He adds, “Unfortunately, CCGTs require large volumes of natural gas and will produce significantly more nitric oxide and carbon dioxide, the latter a major source of global warming. From a cost perspective, a new CCGT will be twice as expensive and significantly more uncertain as the price of natural gas represents more than 70 percent of a CCGT’s operating costs.”Dr. Axelrod emphasized, “It should not be misconstrued, solar, wind and biofuels can and should all contribute to Vermont’s portfolio of energy resources, but to assume that 620 MW of Vermont Yankee power can be replaced by 2013 is unrealistic.”In fact, the expanded use of renewable electricity power sources longer term will help reduce Vermont’s carbon footprint further. Currently, automobiles account for 46 percent of the state’s carbon footprint, almost twice the national average of 25 percent. With the electrification of automobiles expected to become more popular in the near future, there will be even more need for clean sources of electricity.Commenting on the study, Brad Ferland, President of the Vermont Energy Partnership said, “There are many intriguing findings in this study that should be part of the discussion not only about Vermont Yankee but of Vermont’s overall energy future. At a time when it is critical to keep and expand clean sources of power, Vermont Yankee has a paramount role to play in Vermont’s energy and economic infrastructure. We look forward to discussing the findings and ramifications with policy makers.”Jennifer Clancy, an environmentalist and board member of the Vermont Energy Partnership said, “While there is no silver bullet to Vermont’s vast and growing energy challenges, a combination of Vermont Yankee and expanded use of renewable sources are central to the state’s energy future. This report shows the respective roles, and time frame, that these sources can and should play in the coming years.”To view a full copy of the study, “An Independent Assessment of the Environmental and Economic Impacts Associated with the Closing of the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Plant,” visit www.vtep.org(link is external). For more information on Energy Strategies, Inc. visit www.energystrategiesinc.com(link is external) .The Vermont Energy Partnership (www.vtep.org(link is external)) is a diverse group of more than 95 business, labor, and community leaders committed to finding clean, affordable and reliable electricity solutions. Its mission is to educate policy makers, the media, businesses, and the general public about why electricity is imperative for prosperity, and about the optimal solutions to preserve and expand our electricity network. Entergy, owner of Vermont Yankee, is a member of the Vermont Energy Partnership.last_img read more

South Africa announce racial quotas for national team

first_img(REUTERS)-Cricket South Africa (CSA) have put in place racial quotas for the national team across all three formats of the game in an effort to increase the number of black players in a sport still dominated by whites.CSA have sought an average minimum of six Black players, of which two must be Black African, in matches over the season, the organisation announced yesterday.The move will have little immediate impact on the team as those targets were reached in the recent test series win over New Zealand when the side was at full-strength bar the absence of injured captain AB de Villiers.“The Test starting XI that played in the recent series against New Zealand contained six players of colour and two Black Africans, and the ODI starting XI had as many as eight players of colour in their most recent series against the West Indies and Australia,” CSA President Chris Nenzani said in a statement.“With the targets being measured over the full season and being cumulative across all three formats, our selectors and team management will have the flexibility to deal with varying circumstances.“This shows very clearly that the targets are very attainable and sustainable and we will maintain the world-class standards that our players regularly produce.”South Africa are next in action in a one-day international against Ireland on Sept. 25, before meeting Australia in the first of five 50-over matches at home on Sept. 30.CSA have already introduced quotas for the country’s domestic franchise competitions where teams must field at least six players of colour, including three black African players.However, South Africa’s sports minister Fikile Mbalula has been critical of what he says is the slow rate of change in the country’s major sporting codes, bar footballThe government has been pushing for more black representation in the national teams of popular sports like cricket and rugby still dominated by whites who were favoured for selection during apartheid rule.It banned its national cricket and rugby federations from hosting or bidding for international tournaments for at least a year in April due to their failure to increase their representation of black players.The country has seen greater participation among black players in most sports at junior level despite the challenge of providing adequate school facilities in poorer districts but Mbalula wants to see this reflected at national team level.last_img read more