CUNY Law School honors Gates

first_imgLauded legal scholar, best-selling author, and Harvard’s Alphonse Fletcher University Professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. will be honored at City University of New York School of Law’s annual Public Interest Law Association Gala and Auction benefit March 23 at Judson Memorial Church in New York City.Students will present Gates with an honorary degree to recognize his scholarship, achievements, and unwavering commitment to civil rights and social justice. Gates, director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard, has written extensively for The New Yorker and The New York Times. He is author of numerous books, most recently “Black in Latin America” and “Faces of America,” which expand on his critically acclaimed PBS documentaries. He is also editor-in-chief of TheRoot.com, a daily online magazine focusing on issues of interest to the African-American community, written from an African-American perspective.last_img read more

Identity Project of Notre Dame prepares for annual Edith Stein Conference

first_imgUnder the theme “Even Unto Death: Embracing the Love of the Cross,” the Identity Project of Notre Dame is hosting its 13th annual Edith Stein Conference, the largest student-run conference on campus. The event will start Friday at 1 p.m. and end Saturday with a banquet starting at 6:15 p.m. in McKenna Hall.Co-chair and senior Molly Weiner said the conference embraces a unique mix of academic and personal topics. The speakers range from professors at Notre Dame to students from other colleges across the country.“It’s a mix between a lecture from a professor, and then the next talk will be a self-help — this was my experience, this is how to change this part of your life,” she said.The event will feature two keynote lectures and various other talks on a range of topics relating to identity and relationships, Weiner said.“The conference in general was made for an opportunity for people on campus to come together and talk about topics related to relationships and friendship and personal identity and dignity that kind of isn’t really covered on campus because we’re more focused on our academics, and if we are in our friend group, sometimes we’re scared to talk about certain topics,” she said.Weiner said the conference tries to focus on the needs of students.“We do talk about things like dating, discernment, what you want to do with your life, sometimes how student life can be difficult,” she said.Junior Theresa Gallagher, who is in charge of fundraising, said the conference is relevant to students in the sense that it discusses issues that are directly applicable to their lives.“It just changes the way you think about relationships when all of the sudden you hear a talk about the cross as a gift of love,” she said. “It provides a space to hear those reflections, to think about them, to talk about them with other people, and it transforms the way you look at your everyday life. I’m not thinking about these things every single minute of every single day, but to have this place where it can provide that lens to see your whole life, your whole experience, in a different way.”For club president and junior Emily Hirshorn, the best parts of the conference are outside the formal sessions.“My favorite times are in between all the talks when there’s food out and students come together and really get to foster meaningful conversations about the speakers we just heard,” she said.While registration for the conference is open, Weiner said students can choose to attend the talks they want without registering in advance. She said the club itself is a continuation of the conversation at the conference, and Hirshorn said the club provides a lot of flexibility to discuss different topics.“It’s all about fostering conversations that matter,” Hirshorn said.Weiner said she began her role in April of last year and brainstormed topics over the summer. She began to book speakers and logistics in September.“It is a very difficult task to do something like this, but it’s worth every minute of it,” she said.Hirshorn said the conference is particularly important in that it encourages students to learn how to approach certain problems in life.“If we really take the time to learn how to approach difficult subjects, especially in light of the Catholic faith that a lot of us share, that can have a really transformative power,” she said. “… Suffering, in particular, is a topic I think we all struggle with in different forms, especially when it seems undeserved.”Tags: Edith Stein Conference, identity, Identity Project of Notre Dame, relationshipslast_img read more

SMC students return from study abroad

first_imgFrom the streets of Seville, Spain; Rome, Italy; and Ifrane, Morocco, a wave of Belles have returned home to Saint Mary’s this week. Despite the snow and ice, many Belles say they are happy to be back.Sophomore Cassidy Miller said she always knew she wanted to study abroad, but it was not until she heard from a Belle who had spent a semester in Italy that she knew she wanted to go to Rome.She said the hardest part about coming back to campus was the overcast and frigid temperatures.Besides the language barrier, Miller said the hardest part about studying abroad in Rome was doing her homework.“It’s a lot busier, because there’s a lot of people in the city — not that they’re always in a rush or anything, but there’s always things to do, a lot of shops and restaurants,” she said. “It was a different experience for me to try and finish schoolwork while still trying to experience and see everything in the city. When you’re here [at Saint Mary’s], you do your schoolwork and then go back to your room. There, I was sitting in my room until I realized that I should be out exploring things.”The best part about studying in Rome was her proximity to the Vatican and St. Peter’s Basilica, Miller said, and that there was always something to do in Rome. However, coming back to campus has been difficult because she has to find more ways to keep herself occupied, she said.“Living in Rome, there’s something new to do everyday,” Miller said. “Here, I’ve been trying to find some things to do in order to keep myself busy so I don’t have so much downtime that I start to miss it.”Junior Sophia McDevitt, who studied in Ireland last semester, said sharing her study abroad experience with her friends was difficult at first.“The most obvious challenge to me was that all my friends had met all these new people and so many relationships had subtly shifted and I had missed it,” she said. “I suddenly showed back up and had to figure out everything that had and hadn’t happened, while also digesting what I had just experienced.”McDevitt said opening up to fellow Belles who did not or will not study abroad was also challenging.“I knew a lot of my friends had wanted to study abroad, but because of their scholarships or their majors they couldn’t,” she said. “So, I wanted to make sure it didn’t sound like I was bragging when I talked about the Spanish friends I made at dinner in Alicante or how beautiful the Swiss Alps were or how I loved sitting around and talking with my European friends from all different countries. Instead of talking, I found myself holding it all in.”But McDevitt said once she started sharing her experiences abroad, she found students were interested and encouraged her to open up more.“Once I started sharing, I was reminded that those who care about me cared about hearing what was on my mind,” she said. “Now, I find myself sharing random tidbits more often as things pop back into my head.”Although the weather may be dismal, the friendships may have shifted and the days may be monotonous, Miller said the best thing about being back on campus is reuniting with her fellow Belles.“Coming back can be a little bit scary because you do get so accustomed to the culture over there, but as long as you keep yourself busy and have supportive friends, that makes the transition back to campus a lot easier,” she said. “There’s comfort in the sisterhood here.”Tags: Saint Mary’s study abroad, SMC study abroad, winter breaklast_img read more

Customer shot in face after complaining about slow service

first_imgThe 39-year-old victim was taken to the hospital and is in serious condition but is expected to recover.Anyone with information about the shooting is asked to call police at 772-577-0753 or Treasure Coast Crime Stoppers at 800-273-TIPS. A Miami man was shot in the face after he made a complain over slow service at a smoothie shop in Fort Pierce, police said.The incident took place Sunday afternoon when the victim, who was a customer at the Tropical Smoothie Cafe on Okeechobee Road, was complaining about how long it was taking his order to be prepared. Fort Pierce police spokesman Mike Jachles said a masked gunman then entered the business and confronted the customer and then shot him in the face.The gunman fled the scene, and police were not able to find him.last_img read more