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Mars Life Would Spit Out the Water

first_img(Visited 86 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Finding minimal amounts of salty water contaminated with perchorates is not helpful to life.The optimistic astrobiology reporter Pallab Ghosh at the BBC is at it again, tantalizing readers with thoughts of Martians. In his piece “Is there life on Mars?” he retells the history of his optimistic antecedent, Percival Lowell, who spent his fortune seeking the “canals” on Mars that he mistranslated from Schiaparelli’s map. Ghosh whisks the reader along to Vikings 1 and 2 that, in 1976, seemed to present negative results on the life question. But now, he says, new findings about gullies on some craters has provided “The strongest evidence yet that water still flows on the Martian surface.” And everyone knows what that means:For there to be life, there needs to be liquid water. Evidence for that has been growing and earlier this week Nasa [sic] seemed to have the the strongest evidence yet that some is still there – albeit in small amounts.The discovery confirms that the Red Planet is still geologically active and, tantalisingly, it increases the possibility that it may currently harbour simple living organisms….The discovery confirms that the Red Planet is still geologically active and, tantalisingly, it increases the possibility that it may currently harbour simple living organisms.Ghosh seems to have an affection for the word “tantalizing” which is mostly what he does in his article. He ends with a quote that tantalizes the imagination:“If we find life on Mars and it can be shown to be of a different origin to that on Earth, then that essentially means that the Universe is teeming with life. It seems almost impossible that life could spring up by chance on two adjacent planets if life was rare.“But can two examples in the same solar system around one star mean the universe is teeming with life? Looks like a bad case of extrapolation. As for life springing up by chance, maybe he needs to think a little about the numbers (see online book).Ghosh’s imagination sprang from water to life (hydrobioscopy). What if the water is so bad, Martians would spit it out? Nadia Drake at National Geographic is a tad more realistic:You might think that the first human explorers on Mars will park next to a salty stream and use it to manufacture fresh drinking water. Maybe they could even find life in damp Martian nooks and crannies, areas where the dusty red planet can still fuel microbes.Reality is much more subtle. Finding evidence for flowing water is not the same as finding life. Right now, scientists don’t know where this water is coming from, or if the chemistry in these Martian seeps is even life-friendly. And unfortunately, chances are it will be a long time before we can get there to find out.Drake also points to evidence from Earth that is not encouraging to Mars-lifers:[Chris] McKay notes that the type of salts near the Martian streaks, called perchlorates, form different watery mixtures than the salts we’re most used to on Earth. In fact, it’s possible the perchlorate streaks could behave similarly to Antarctica’s Don Juan Pond, which is the saltiest liquid water body on Earth—and totally dead.“Such a brine is not suitable for life and is of no interest biologically,” McKay says. “Nothing can live in the brine of Don Juan Pond.”Jonathan Amos at the BBC News is also optimistic about water and life, but realistic about the chance of finding it on Mars without contaminating the planet with our own germs. “Wherever there’s water, there’s a good chance life can thrive,” he tantalizes, but then descends into the depressing realities of trying to get close to those crater slopes with spacecraft to check them out.Maybe instead we should just look for Martians on Earth. PhysOrg published an article titled, “Rock samples from Western US teach how to hunt for life on Mars.” This article even got religion:The search for life beyond Earth is one of the grandest endeavors in the history of humankind—a quest that could transform our understanding of our universe both scientifically and spiritually.One again, tantalizing suggestions tempt the reader to think that if water is there, life must exist (or at least be possible). The NASA announcement, though, presents “salty” water. Salt is not good for cells trying to emerge (4/15/02). Perchlorates are worse.Since it’s so hard to study Mars directly, there’s an easier way: study rocks that look like fossil microbial mats. Stromatolites, the “apartment buildings” of microbes could, in the meantime, teach scientists how to use instruments to detect life if they ever find similar rocks on Mars and return them to Earth some day. They could, that is, if scientists find a way to distinguish them:She [Alison Olcott-Marshall, U of Kansas] said microbial and non-microbial rocks are found in similar environments, with identical preservation histories for millions of years, and many of the same chemical parameters, such as amounts of organic carbon preserved in the rocks.Let’s say we get a sample return from the 2020 Mars mission, and it has a layered appearance. We will still only look “tantalizingly” like maybe there might have been perhaps life once upon a time on Mars, but they won’t know, because it could be “non-microbial.”All this hydrobioscopy depends on clean water. Chris McKay, despite his optimism, knows that. In Live Science‘s piece “Why is water so essential to life,” he compares water to other liquids like methane, for which we have no evidence life could make something of it instead of water. The article admits, though, that “the briny flows” detected by NASA “may be too full of chlorine-based salts to support life” — how then, exactly, does this “raise the odds that Mars could have life right now”?Perhaps Mars had a lot more water in the past. Or maybe it’s there and we just can’t see it.Researchers in Barcelona are revisiting accounts of Martian megafloods, inferring past events from geological evidence. Science Daily ups the perhapsimaybecouldness index:A recent study puts forward a new explanation for the Martian megafloods: enormous discharges of subterranean water that dug out the biggest flood channels in the solar system over 3 billion years ago….In the words of the Geology Department researchers, “Our research suggests that, given that the process was regional rather than global, there could still be large reservoirs of subterranean water trapped under the surface of Mars, in the areas around the old northern ocean, or in other parts of the planet where seas and lakes formed at the same time.” “Traces of ancient environments capable of sustaining life forms similar to those on Earth could have been preserved in sub-surface materials that are now exposed,” claim R. Linares and M. Zarroca. “The results obtained could have clear implications both for exobiological research and for future human activity on Mars.”These researchers think the floods were local rather than global, resulting from oceans, lakes and glaciers. One of their illustrations superimposes the estimated Martian floods over Europe, showing large parts of Spain, France and eastern Europe inundated.It’s evident that much of astrobiology depends on divination techniques deriving from the imaginations of their own hearts (1/17/07 commentary). They imagine themselves gaining understanding, both scientifically and spiritually. Since spirits are not made of atoms, these prophets betray their dependence on imaginary religions of their own devising.last_img read more

Ohio State’s National Championship Rings Are Hurting The Buckeyes’ FIFA Playing Ability

first_imgOhio State's national championship rings.Ohio State’s 2014 football team received its national championship rings this morning. There are, of course, many benefits to wearing a championship ring: they look cool, they go with everything and they remind people that you are a national champion. There’s a downside, though: they hurt your video-game skills. You know how hard it is to win a FIFA game with this ring on? Feel me @jbbigbear we just take it for granted without it— Joe Burger (@jburgs37) March 27, 2015Perhaps the people who design the national championship rings should figure out a way to make them lighter so it’s easier to score goals in FIFA.last_img read more

The NCAA Tournaments Most Where The Hell Is That College Colleges Ranked

Villanova UniversityPenn.77– Xavier UniversityOhio64– Vanderbilt UniversityTenn.89– College of the Holy CrossMass.60– St. Joseph’s UniversityPenn.47– Butler UniversityInd.78– Austin Peay State UniversityTenn.36– Gonzaga UniversityWash.80– Iona CollegeN.Y.66– Temple UniversityPenn.85– Stony Brook UniversityN.Y.78– Purdue UniversityInd.89%– Southern UniversityLa.44– Survey of 3,749 respondents from March 15 to 17 There are nine schools with less than 90 percent but more than 75 percent recognition. With these, a lot of the fun lies in seeing people’s wrong answers. Did you know 10 percent of the people surveyed think Yale is in Massachusetts and 7.5 percent think Purdue is in Illinois? You do now, and please do what you can to alert people from those schools of this fact as often as possible. Also, dang, people do not know where Yale is: More people in this sample knew where Temple and Baylor were than that Yale is in Connecticut.There’s a big drop to the next batch, which is the schools where people answered correctly two-thirds to just more than half of the time. Iona, Xavier, College of the Holy Cross and Fairleigh Dickinson threw people for a loop, but all managed to obtain majorities. It’s these enigmatic Jesuits, I’m telling you.But without further ado, let’s break down the Final Five. A majority of respondents couldn’t place Hampton, St. Joseph’s, Southern and Weber State universities. Philly-based St. Joe’s was matched up with three other heavily Catholic Northeastern states; Southern, in Louisiana, was matched up with other states in the Deep South; and Utah’s Weber State — already a hell of a deep cut when it comes to nomenclature — was, according to 29 percent of respondents, in Montana.The last of this group is Austin Peay State University, a 16-seed doomed to fall to Kansas in the first round. Austin, while it is indeed a city in Texas, is also a first name on occasion, which is how the Tennessee institution obtained its name. Not only did a majority of respondents not know that Austin Peay is in Tennessee, but also a plurality of them thought it was in Texas. It was the only time in the set that more people picked one incorrect state over the school’s home state.But seriously, call a Yalie and tell them that one in 10 people think they’re in Massachusetts. They’ll flip. University of MiamiFla.89– Weber State UniversityUtah39– Hampton UniversityVa.50– Fairleigh Dickinson UniversityN.J.50– Where is that school, anyway? Many schools obtained a bid to the NCAA Division I men’s basketball tournament, but the vast majority of schools did not. I went to one of the latter. In keeping with the tradition of trolling the small schools that did in fact make it in, it’s time to play the game of Where The Hell Is [Obscure College]? — but with a FiveThirtyEight twist: data on precisely how obscure each school is.On Tuesday, I set up a Google Form that we pushed out on our social channels asking people which of four states they thought each college was in.1The states were always the same, but the order was randomized for both questions and answers. (As a result, this isn’t a scientific sample.) For many schools, such as the University of Kentucky, this didn’t prove very difficult. For others, including a few that are named after their location, it was substantially harder. And for three schools — Florida Gulf Coast University, Stephen F. Austin and Seton Hall — not even our Google Form could locate them. (A bug discovered in editing prevented the questions for those schools from displaying. Sorry, Lumberjacks.)Broadly, the results broke down into five categories. In the first group, 38 of the 65 schools, more than 99 percent of people got it right. Given that when I pulled the data we had 3,749 respondents, this allows for at most 37 trolls from Ohio who pretend that they do not in fact know where the University of Michigan is.The next group comprises the nine schools for which 90 percent to 99 percent of people knew the location. This is essentially two situations: schools named after cities, such as the universities of Tulsa, Dayton and Cincinnati (most but not all people know where Tulsa, Dayton and Cincinnati are) and schools with unusual names that have crazy high familiarity, such as Baylor and Notre Dame.This brings us to the next three groups, the ones worth talking about. COLLEGESTATEPERCENT WHO LOCATED SCHOOL IN THE CORRECT STATE Yale UniversityConn.84– read more

Deshaun Thomas shows versatility in loss to Kansas

LAWRENCE, Kan. — On an otherwise glum day for the No. 2-ranked Ohio State men’s basketball team Saturday, sophomore forward Deshaun Thomas was one of the few bright spots for the Buckeyes. Thomas helped keep the Buckeyes competitive as they suffered their first loss of the year in a 78-67 defeat against Kansas at Allen Fieldhouse. Thomas shot 50 percent from the field, and finished the game with 19 points. Sophomore forward Jared Sullinger was absent from the OSU lineup due to back spasms he suffered during the Buckeyes’ Nov. 29 win against Duke. As a result, Thomas was forced to split time defending Kansas’ 6-foot-10 forward Thomas Robinson with Buckeyes’ freshman center Amir Williams. Robinson ended the game with 21 points, but Thomas said OSU coach Thad Matta was complimentary of Thomas’ defensive effort against Robinson after the game. “Coach just said I did pretty well with (Robinson),” Thomas said. “We tried to switch it up and confuse him.” Matta said the additional work was taxing for Thomas. “(Thomas) went 40 (minutes) tonight,” Matta said. “He wouldn’t have had to. He could have been a little bit fresher down the stretch.” Thomas still had enough left in his tank to contribute on the offensive end. Down the stretch, Thomas said his teammates wanted the ball in his hands and that Matta told him to be ready. “I came into the game hitting shots,” Thomas said. “I figured since (Sullinger) wasn’t playing, somebody has to make up for those points. So, I just kept my head in and knocked down some big (3-pointers) in the first half.” Thomas was 7-of-14 from the field and 3-of-7 shooting from 3-point territory in his 40 minutes of work. Two of his three made 3-pointers came on back-to-back possessions with just under eight minutes to play in the first half as OSU trailed, 23-16. Kansas coach Bill Self said that Thomas was a challenge for his team to guard. “In the first half… we were going to make Thomas make shots and keep Craft out of the (lane), and he made us pay,” Self said. Thomas said his shooting success was the product of working on each facet of his game during practice leading up to the Kansas game. “I mix it up in practice,” he said. “I play with the bigs and the shooters in practice. I’m versatile.” The Buckeyes wouldn’t go quietly Saturday, despite the eventual loss. OSU cut the margin to four at 62-58 with 5:39 to play. When Kansas’ lead grew to 10 points with fewer than three minutes to play, the Buckeyes cut that lead as well, coming to within six points with 1:56 to play. Comeback attempt after comeback attempt fell short in the end, but Thomas said the entire team was encouraged by how it competed. “We’re a competitive team and that’s a positive,” he said. “Without (Sullinger), we came out and competed without him. We’re a great team with him — don’t get me wrong — but we came out and competed.” OSU returns to action Wednesday against South Carolina-Upstate at the Schottenstein Center. Opening tip is set for 7:30 p.m. read more

Columbus police officer doubles as Clippers bullpen catcher

Jason Kulp, an officer for Columbus Division of Police, has added a new uniform to his wardrobe for the summer. Kulp has been named the Columbus Clippers’ bullpen catcher and will be in right field this season. With the position comes the opportunity to catch for the pitchers of the Cleveland Indians’ minor league affiliate and have one of the best seats in the house for all of the home games. His main responsibilities include warming pitchers up in the bullpen and catching for pitchers on their off days. Kulp, who grew up in Columbus, played baseball for four years and majored in criminal justice at Tiffin University before graduating in 2010. He then chose to return to Columbus to join the police department. Kulp’s favorite part of his new job for the Clippers is being able to call himself part of the team. “Just being out here and seeing these guys play. I mean, I’ve been playing for so long … it’s just good to be back out on the dirt,” he said. But Kulp is no stranger to the Columbus Clippers. He can remember going to Clippers games when the team played at Cooper Stadium before switching to the Huntington Park in 2009. The opportunity to become the bullpen catcher was presented by fellow officer and teammate on the Columbus Police Department’s baseball team, Scott Polgar. Kulp jumped at the opportunity and within a day had tried out and gotten the job. Having two jobs could be overwhelming, but Kulp seems unfazed by the busy summer ahead of him. He described it as a “pre-work activity” and admitted it will time-consuming, but was sure it would be well worth it. George Robinson, director of clubhouse operations for the Clippers, said Kulp is adjusting well to the new job. “He’s fitting in very well. He’s a very polite young man, pretty cordial and that’s the kind of people we need. And he wants to be here,” Robinson said. Columbus Clippers pitcher Scott Barnes threw to Kulp and was happy with what he saw. “Sometimes you can tell (from) throwing a few pitches to them whether or not they’ve had some experience,” Barnes said. “He seemed like he handled himself well and I look forward to throwing to him this year.” read more

Ohio State womens volleyball set for road matchup with No 12 Illinois

OSU junior middle blocker Tyler Richardson (23) leaps to spike a set by OSU senior setter Taylor Sherwin (8) during a match against Maryland on Nov. 7 at St. John Arena.Credit: Madelyn Grant / Lantern photographerThe No. 17 Ohio State women’s volleyball team is set for a chance at a season sweep against No. 12 Illinois when the two teams go head-to-head Wednesday night.The Fighting Illini (19-6, 11-3) and Buckeyes (18-8, 9-5) played earlier this season in Columbus in a closely contested battle. Ending in five sets, the Buckeyes prevailed, 16-14, in the final frame.Three days later, the Fighting Illini traveled to then-No. 5 Penn State and defeated the defending national champions in four sets.Coach Geoff Carlston said he expects the Fighting Illini coaching staff to motivate the team because the previous matchup was so close and either team could’ve won.“Obviously there’s going to be a little bit of a payback,” Carlston said. “I’m sure their coaching staff is going to use that, say, ‘Hey remember what happened last time?’ Whenever you play a team twice, and you win the first one, there’s some motivation there certainly, and playing at their court, they have a good crowd, and it’s a lot tougher to play on the road than it is at home.”Since playing in Columbus on Oct. 8, the Fighting Illini have won eight of nine conference matches, with the lone loss coming at Northwestern on Nov. 5. The Buckeyes have won six of nine conference matchups in that stretch.Freshman outside hitter Luisa Schirmer said she’s seen a lot of improvement in the team since playing the Fighting Illini earlier this season.“We’ve been getting better, we’ve been working hard to fix a few things that we know we wanted to make some improvements on,” Schirmer said.She added that the Buckeyes need to work on “staying steady and consistent” if they want to come out of Huff Hall with a win.Freshman defensive specialist Kalisha Goree has seen improvements in the gym, too, she said.“Every day we’re just coming here trying to get better,” Goree said. “And I can see an improvement in all the girls.”The Fighting Illini will be led by sophomore middle blocker Katie Stadick, who ranks first in the Big Ten in blocks per set with an average of 1.46. Redshirt-junior outside hitter Jocelynn Birks is also top in the conference in points per set with an average of 4.54.The team as a whole is first in the conference in blocks, averaging 2.88 per set, and second in digs with 15.01 per set.Senior outside hitter Erin Sekinger said the team will treat Wednesday’s contest like any other match, even though the Fighting Illini might be fighting for revenge.“We just have to take every road trip like it is,” Sekinger said. “We just have to really focus and do what we did against them when they came to our house.”Wednesday’s match is scheduled to start at 8 p.m. in Champaign, Ill. read more

Mens Lacrosse Ohio State defeats Towson 1110 to advance to NCAA championship

Ohio State players celebrate a goal in the first quarter against Loyola Maryland in the first round of the NCAA tournament on May 14, 2017 at Ohio Stadium. Credit: Sheridan Hendrix | Oller ReporterOhio State’s men’s lacrosse team is headed to the NCAA championship game for the first time in program history as the Buckeyes knocked off Towson 11-10 in the semifinals on Saturday.Trailing the Tigers 8-3 early in the second quarter, the game looked to be potentially out of reach for the Buckeyes. But behind an 8-1 run in the second half, OSU completed a miraculous comeback in the Buckeyes’ first-ever appearance in the semifinals.Towson (12-5) struck first as senior midfielder Mike Lynch scored the first goal of the game with 10:36 remaining in the first quarter. But the Buckeyes (16-4) found the back of the net twice in eight seconds as sophomore attackman Jack Jasinski and sophomore midfielder Logan Maccani scored a goal apiece to give OSU its first lead of the game.Late in the first quarter, Towson evened the game up at two when sophomore midfielder Jon Mazza barely slipped the ball over the goal line.The Tigers opened the game up early in the second quarter as two Towson players – senior attackmen Joe Seider (two goals) and Ryan Drenner – scored three goals in the first four minutes of the period.OSU freshman attackman Tre Leclaire ended the run with his first goal of the game, but the Tigers scored twice before the end of the quarter to pull ahead 8-3 at halftime.Towson opened the second half by extending its lead by one goal, but OSU came right back as senior attackman Eric Fannell threw a behind-the-back pass to fellow senior attackman Austin Shanks who finished the highlight-worthy play off with a goal.That goal gave the Buckeyes life.Leclaire scored his second goal of the game on a fast break, then Shanks scored his second goal of the game as OSU utilized a man-up advantage. With 4:11 remaining in the third quarter, Fannell ripped a shot, scoring his first goal of the game to pull the Buckeyes within one goal of tying the Tigers.But Towson senior midfielder Tyler Young ended the Buckeyes run as he scored his 13th goal of the season. OSU ended the season strong, though, as Fannell scored his second goal of the quarter to pull his team within one.With 11:42 remaining in the final quarter, Leclaire fired a laser past Towson’s goalie to tie the game for the first time since the first quarter.The Scarlet and Gray rally didn’t end there.With 10:20 remaining, senior midfielder JT Blubaugh scored, delivering OSU its first advantage since the Buckeyes’ relinquished their 2-1 lead in the first quarter. Just over four minutes later, OSU extended its lead to 11-9 when senior midfielder Johnny Pearson scored his first goal of the game.Towson pulled within a goal with 3:17 remaining as Drenner scored for the fourth time in Saturday’s game. But that was it for the Tigers as the Buckeyes held on for an 11-10 victory, sending them to the championship game.Saturday’s game wasn’t the first matchup between these two teams. OSU knocked off Towson 6-3 on March 15.OSU advanced to the NCAA semifinals with a 7-4 win over Loyola Maryland in the first round and a 16-11 victory against Duke in the quarterfinals. Towson reached the semifinals after upsetting Penn State, 12-8 in the first round, and Syracuse, 10-7 in the quarterfinals. The Buckeyes will take on the winner of Saturday afternoon’s No. 1 Maryland – No. 5 Denver matchup at 1 p.m. on Monday at Gillette Stadium in Foxboro, Massachusetts. read more

Craig Levein expects Naismith to return this month

first_imgHearts manager Craig Levein has revealed he expects Steven Naismith to return to action before the end of December.The former Norwich City striker picked up an injury during the early stages of the Scottish League Cup semifinal on October 28.Levein has marked the game against Aberdeen on December 22 as a potential return date for Naismith and the former Rangers forward remains on target in his recovery from a cartilage operation.News: Pereira has gone on loan from United to Hearts George Patchias – August 13, 2019 The young Portuguese goalkeeper has secured a loan deal for the remainder of the season to Hearts of the Scottish Premier League.According to a…“The recovery has gone well,” said Naismith, according to Sports Mole.“I’m at the late stage of the rehab and I feel good. We have hit every target along the way and it’s more a case of finishing that off and having some good training and then I’ll be available.”“I know we spoke about the Aberdeen game but I’ll not tempt fate, I’ll just get my head down and work hard.”last_img read more

Messis Argentina return depends on coach says AFA head

first_imgHead of the Argentine Football Association (AFA) Claudio Tapia says Barcelona forward Lionel Messi never left the national team and will be ready when coach Lionel Scaloni calls upon himMessi has not featured for his national team since his team crashed out of the 2018 FIFA World Cup with a  4-3 defeat to France on June 30“Leo Messi never left the national team,” AFA president Claudio Tapia said in an interview published on the association’s website via Xinhua.FC Barcelona, Valencia CFMatch Preview: Barcelona vs Valencia Boro Tanchev – September 14, 2019 Is derby time in La Liga, as Barcelona welcomes Valencia to the Camp Nou Stadium tonight at 21:00 (CET).“I think the love he has for the shirt is so great that when he is called upon he’ll be there, I have no doubt about that. It will depend on the coach and not on him.”Tapia said Messi had been in a positive mood when the pair met in Madrid earlier this month after the Copa Libertadores final between River Plate and Boca Juniors.“He looked happy, very happy,” he said. “I hope that he will be a part of Argentina’s upcoming squads because it makes people happy watching him play. He represents our country and is a standard-bearer for world football. He is the best player in the world, without doubt”last_img read more