Tag: 杭州桑拿

No pardon for Ali Lmrabet

first_imgNews Morocco / Western SaharaMiddle East – North Africa Morocco / Western SaharaMiddle East – North Africa Organisation News News Follow the news on Morocco / Western Sahara Help by sharing this information RSF_en June 8, 2021 Find out more to go furthercenter_img July 30, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 No pardon for Ali Lmrabet RSF joins Middle East and North Africa coalition to combat digital surveillance Receive email alerts April 28, 2021 Find out more News NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say Jailed newspaper editor Ali Lmrabet was not one of the 669 prison inmateswho received a royal pardon from King Mohammed VI on “Throne Day” on 30July, the fourth anniversary of his accession to the Moroccan throne. Thepardons were announced on the eve of the anniversary.—————————————————————————————————————-4 july 2003 Continuing concern about Ali Lmrabet’s healthReporters Without Borders said today it continued to be very concerned about the health of imprisoned newspaper editor Ali Lmrabet, calling for his personal physician to be allowed to visit him in the Rabat hospital where he is being held and for him to be moved to a private room.A group of four doctors who visited him on 29 June, six days after he called off a hunger strike he had kept up for 50 days, reported finding alarming symptoms such as “nervous disorders and renal colic.” A close relative said he is suffering from “terrible diarrhea, which is aggravating his dehydration, and biological imbalances.” Other sources, however, have said he is improving.Reporters Without Borders said Lmrabet’s personal doctor, Jamila Rhandy, who has not been able to see him since 13 June, should be allowed to resume visiting him and to carry out all necessary tests. The organisation also said he should be given his own room in the hospital because his immune defences are very weak.The owner and editor of two satirical weeklies, the French-language Demain Magazine and the Arabic-language Douman, Lmrabet was imprisoned on 21 May and is serving a three-year sentence for “insulting the person of the king”, “offence against territorial integrity” and “offence against the monarchy.” He was originally sentenced to four years in prison, but this was reduced to three years on a appeal on 17 June. The court also fined him 20,000 dirhams (about 2,000 euros) and banned his two weeklies. He was rushed from prison to Avicenne hospital in Rabat on 26 May. Hunger strike is last resort for some imprisoned Moroccan journalists April 15, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Global technology leaders to meet in Limerick

first_imgLimerick Chamber appoint new President Linkedin Advertisement TAGSITLGLIMERICK ChamberLimerick Local AuthoritiesLITMusic LimerickUL Facebook Previous articleBruce Springsteen rocks LimerickNext articleIn Conversation – the McCourt Bros at Lime Tree Theatre John Keoghhttp://www.limerickpost.ie WhatsApp Announcing the ‘ Global Technology Leaders Summit’ to be held in Limerick in January were John Hartnett, ITLG founder; Dr. Maria Hinfelaar, LIT president; and Con Murray, manager, Limerick Local Authorities. Pic: Kieran ClancyAnnouncing the ‘ Global Technology Leaders Summit’ to be held in Limerick in January were John Hartnett, ITLG founder; Dr. Maria Hinfelaar, LIT president; and Con Murray, manager, Limerick Local Authorities. Pic: Kieran ClancyA MAJOR summit of global technology leaders, high-level executives, entrepreneurs and investors will convene in Limerick for the two-day ITLG conference in January as part of the Limerick City of Culture 2014 programme.The summit was announced this week by ITLG (Irish Technology Leadership Group) founder and president John Hartnett at LIT, which secured the event for the city alongside UL, Limerick Chamber, Limerick Local Authorities and Shannon Airport.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The January event will mark the second time the ITLG will bring the summit to Limerick since 2010.Mr Hartnett commented: “This summit will be a unique, once-off opportunity next year for technology companies to tap into the ITLG’s powerful and influential diaspora business network.“We are looking forward to seeing Ireland’s most innovative and disruptive technologies at the ‘fast pitch’ sessions. Entrepreneurs interested in pitching for investment from the global business leaders and investors should embrace the opportunity of the ITLG Summit and get in touch with us immediately.”He added that ITLG’s goal was to “identify the most promising entrepreneurial opportunities and investments in the global technology industry”.Participants will have the opportunity to meet and network with innovative companies, technologists, influential investors and purchasing decision-makers in the technology industry.The event will include ‘fast pitch’ sessions for entrepreneurs, business start-ups and innovative businesses to pitch for investment at the fourth annual ITLG University Challenge award and Technology Leaders Summit as well as a gala networking dinner.Submissions are now being invited from organisations all over the country for the fast-pitch session on January 27 2014.A Global Technology Leaders Summit, University Challenge Award, and a gala networking dinner will take place the following day.For more information go to www.itlg.org. International Women’s Day LIT RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img Aer Lingus announcement for Shannon base – Limerick Chamber statement Women in the Creative Arts to take centre stage at LIT’s International Women’s Day Flagship Event NewsGlobal technology leaders to meet in LimerickBy John Keogh – July 17, 2013 1091 Print Twitter Limerick Post Show | FOLM Project Email Chamber calls for O’Connell Street revitalisation programme to commence as matter of urgencylast_img read more

Driving through flexible changes

first_img Previous Article Next Article Bob Beddow has one of the toughest jobs in HR, as he brings in flexibleworking practices aimed at transforming MG Rover. In 2000, it was facingclosure and losing millions. Now the car manufacturer is on course to make itsfirst profits by 2004For such a small player in a global car market dominated by multinationals,simply surviving is a minor miracle for MG Rover. But the fledgling company hasalso had to stem huge losses and establish new working practices during itstwo-and-a-half years of existence. When BMW sold the troubled Longbridge car plant in May 2000 to a consortiumof businessmen, few rated its chances of success. However, last year, losseswere cut to £187m, more than half the level they were running at during thecompany’s first eight months. This year, losses are predicted to be in the tens of millions rather thanthe hundreds, and the chief executive Kevin Howe is optimistic it will moveinto profit during 2004. Morale is still good despite a huge shortfall of spare parts earlier thisyear, when production stopped for a week. One of the main factors underpinning this turnaround has been to persuadeits 3,500 production workers of the need for working time accounts (WTA). These are becoming widespread throughout the industry, making labour supplymatch production cycles much more closely than in the past. Instead of usingovertime and temporary workers to boost output, and lay-offs and redundanciesto cut it, employees work longer hours without overtime pay. This ‘uptime’ isthen banked and used up when shorter working time or ‘downtime’ is necessaryduring periods of reduced demand. Earlier this year, the issue forced a strike ballot, which Sir Ken Jackson,general secretary of Amicus, said would have been a catastrophe if the vote hadgone against the company. A new deal guaranteeing WTA for the next three years was accepted, but BobBeddow, MG Rover HR director, said the battle to sell the concept to theworkforce still goes on with unions continuing to play their part as well ashis department. How did a company come so perilously close to conflict so soon afterescaping closure? Beddow explained that industrial relations tensions over the issue developedas memories of the company’s rescue began to fade. He said one of the reasonswas that it was easy for staff to misinterpret WTA as a dodge by the company toavoid paying overtime. Two factors in particular raised tensions over the issue. Firstly, manyworkers believed the agreement that originally introduced WTA at Longbridgefrom 1998 expired in 2000. “We challenged that,” said Beddow. “The second thing was that a lot of uptime was being worked under theold agreement through the summer months when traditionally people would rathernot be at work. It put a bit of pressure on the system.” Under the current deal, workers can build up a maximum of 200 hours uptime,where 75 per cent is banked and the remaining 25 per cent is paid for. If, at the end of three years, workers still have outstanding uptime, thecompany will pay for it and wipe the slate clean. The limit on downtime, whereemployees owe time to the company, is also 200 hours. Some concessions were granted. “We put a limit on the amount ofconsecutive weeks we would expect them to work uptime and the amount of hoursthey would be expected to work in a given period,” said Beddow. But, themain lesson learned has been the need to keep on explaining how WTA works. Stewart McKee, group public relations director, said focus groups ofemployees demonstrated that it was understanding WTA rather than the principleof it that was the problem. “Fundamentally, people do agree that we haveto be flexible in a business like the car industry. The thing we had to learnis the need to carry on explaining it to people. “It [WTA] does take three or four explanations because it is socomplicated,” he said. There are two channels of communication to the workforce. One is via theworks committee, elected from shop stewards, and the other is sent outelectronically or verbally via line managers, who are held accountable for theeffectiveness of the communication process within their own area. Beddow says much more effort is put into communication than under BMW. At least three audits are done each month to ensure messages are gettingthrough to the shop-floor. Managers responsible for areas of weakness areencouraged to attend a half-day seminar on the importance of communicating withthe workforce. McKee says the problem often boils down to individual managers lacking theconfidence to deal with difficult questions. “If you want understanding toreach the veins of the business, then you have to do these things,” hesaid. Line managers and union officials are encouraged to sort out localdisagreements on the spot. The success of this is demonstrated by a sharpreduction in the number of issues now dealt with by the formal grievanceprocedure. A hands-on approach is also encouraged when rewarding exceptionalperformance. “We don’t want some great bureaucratic process,” said Beddow.”It operates far better at grassroots level for instant recognition.”A sense of involvement in the company is fostered through 60 per cent of thebusiness being held in shares by the employees. These were offered free when MG Rover was formed and 99 per cent of theworkforce applied for them. Dividends will be paid when the company startsmaking a profit but employees cannot sell their stake if they leave thecompany. Ownership may partly explain why attendance is now running at 97.5 per cent.”Three years ago, we would have budgeted for 5 to 6 per centabsenteeism,” said Beddow, who is one of six MG Rover board members. Other traditional indices are also used to measure HR effectiveness, but hebelieves the overall performance of the business is just as important. “Wedon’t think the business will succeed if we don’t have a good relationship withthe workforce and all that is facilitated through HR,” he said. The culture of the car plant inevitably changed when MG Rover was created.Instead of being part of a multinational with a head office in Germany andsales, marketing and finance departments several miles away, everyone wasbrought under one roof. Some workers ended up at Longbridge under TUPE procedures and others weregiven the choice of working for Land Rover or BMW instead. This created asurplus of production workers, which led to 800 voluntary redundancies. Playing on the advantages of being small probably best explains how much theculture of the business has changed. “You can make quicker decisions, be more effective with communicationand get a better level of understanding among the workforce,” said Beddow.”Small is not always a major disadvantage.” By Guy Sheppard Driving through flexible changesOn 29 Oct 2002 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. last_img read more

Croydon offices: Old timers mix with new blood

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Arsenal v Chelsea: Oscar starts, Hazard on bench

first_imgOscar returns to Chelsea’s starting line-up for the London derby against Arsenal at the Emirates Stadium, where Eden Hazard is on the Blues bench.Oscar comes in for Pedro, while Hazard returns to the squad following a recent groin injury.Arsenal pair Alexis Sanchez and Mesut Ozil have been passed fit after overcoming hamstring and foot problems respectively. Ozil starts, while Sanchez is among the Gunners’ substitutes.Arsenal: Cech, Bellerin, Koscielny, Mertesacker, Monreal, Flamini, Ramsey, Ozil, Campbell, Walcott, Giroud.Subs: Gibbs, Gabriel, Ospina, Oxlade-Chamberlain, Sanchez, Chambers, Elneny.Chelsea: Courtois; Ivanovic, Zouma, Terry, Azpilicueta; Mikel, Matic; Willian, Fabregas, Oscar; Costa.Subs: Begovic, Cahill, Baba Rahman, Loftus-Cheek, Traore, Hazard, Remy.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Undefeated no more: Huskies humbled by Bears

first_imgHumboldt County sports fans may recognize Menlo-Atherton as the team which ended the Eureka High football team’s undefeated season in the NorCal Regional Bowl Game nearly a month ago.On Friday night, the Bears ended another undefeated run, this time belonging to the now once-defeated Fortuna Huskies.The Huskies entered Friday night’s Windsor Holiday Classic semifinal game 13-0 and left it 13-1 after suffering a 73-52 loss at the hands of the Bears.Fortuna has lived off its 3-point shooting …last_img read more

Whale Sonar: Necessity Is the Mother of Invention

first_imgBiosonar is a complex ability possessed by toothed whales and dolphins, bats and some birds.  It includes both the ability to produce signals and to process the echoes to locate prey.  How could such a system evolve?  Scientists at UC Berkeley proposed an answer.  The press release promised a developing story:Behind the sailor’s lore of fearsome battles between sperm whale and giant squid lies a deep question of evolution: How did these leviathans develop the underwater sonar needed to chase and catch squid in the inky depths?Yet the answer was perplexing: bats and whales developed it by developing it —Now, two evolutionary biologists at the University of California, Berkeley, claim that, just as bats developed sonar to chase flying insects through the darkness, dolphins and other toothed whales also developed sonar to chase schools of squid swimming at night at the surface.Their answer, in other words, provided no information on the sequence of mutations that could have been acted on by natural selection to create a complex, interacting system.  It only asserted that the need to dive deep after squid somehow caused the system to be developed – by evolution.    From that premise, they wove an evolutionary story of millions of years, based on the assumption that necessity is the mother of invention. ….the first whales entered the ocean from land about 45 million years ago, and apparently did not echolocate….    At the time whales developed biosonar, nautiloids dominated the oceans.  Lindberg and Pyenson propose that whales first found it possible to track these hard-shelled creatures in surface waters at night by bouncing sounds off of them, an advantage over whales that relied only on moonlight or starlight.  This would have enabled whales to follow the cephalopods as they migrated downwards into the darkness during the day….    Over the millennia, cephalopod species in general – and especially shelled cephalopod species – fell as the number of whale species boomed, possibly because of predation by whales.  Then, about 10 million years ago, the whales seem to have driven the nautiloids out of the open ocean into protected reefs.  Lindberg said that the decline in nautiloid diversity would have forced whales to perfect their sonar to hunt soft-bodied, migrating squid….The scientists recognized the need for better explanations:The most convincing explanation, that echolocation allowed whales to more efficiently find food in the darkness of the deep ocean, ignores the question of evolution.    “How did the whales know there was a large supply of food down in the dark?” asked Lindberg, noting that cephalopods are the most abundant and high-energy resource in the ocean, eaten by 90 percent of all toothed whales.  “What were the intermediate evolutionary steps that got whales down there?”Yet the press release never did explain how the system developed – only that evolution saw a need, and by some unspecified process, developed the “sophisticated biosonar system” used by whales today:“Whales didn’t need to have a very sophisticated sonar system to follow the nautiloids, they could just home in on the hard part,” Lindberg said.  Only later, he added, did they “develop a complex system with finer resolution to detect and capture soft-bodied squid.”The article pointed to biosonar in bats and whales as “strong examples of convergent evolution” – a term that also hides the “how” of engineering design.  They reinforced their claim by pointing to filter-feeding baleen whales and fruit-eating bats that lack sonar because those don’t need the technology to locate their food in the dark.  Since both the sonar-equipped bats and whales are nocturnal, the authors presumed evolution provided the equipment needed to hunt at night.  They did not speculate why the nocturnal bats and whales didn’t simply switch to daytime food with their diurnal colleagues, nor why the squid didn’t just develop stealth technology to evade the sonar.    Apparently, this is an acceptable way to explain things in biology these days.  David Lindberg, UC Berkeley professor of integrative biology, said, “thinking from an evolutionary perspective about existing data from biology, paleontology and ecology could answer questions about the origin of echolocation in bats, shrews and other animals.”  Presumably, it is now permissible to explain how something developed by saying it just developed – an odd development in scientific explanation.OK, folks, we all just saw their shenanigans right there, which means we have developed a keen sense for seeing things in the dark – a case of convergent perspicacity.  Don’t let the ev-illusion squids get away with it.(Visited 20 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Veggie Tales of Human Evolution

first_imgEvolutionists may not know who our human ancestors were, but they know they were vegans.  That seems to be the essence of a couple of new twists on the human evolution saga.Pear-shaped tones:  Paranthropus has been called the “Nutcracker Man” because of robust teeth assumed strong enough to munch on nuts and seeds.  Enter the Sugar-Plum Fairy into this Nutcracker Suite.  Science Daily reported it more likely that this “ancient hominin” (roughly a homonym for hominid) ate fruit.  Researchers at University of Arkansas examined microscopic scratches on the teeth and deduced that Paranthropus wasn’t eating nuts, even if he had the jaws and skull for them.  Instead, it appeared he had been dining on a kind of tutti-fruity jell-o.  The article is accompanied by an artist’s conception of the furry father figure sucking on a big juicy fruit.    Gorillas, for instance, have the equipment for chewing tough leaves, but will take fruit every time if given the choice.  “The morphology suggests what P. boisei could eat, but not necessarily what it did eat,” said the lead researcher.  He explained why this change in thinking is more than a fad diet:“These findings totally run counter to what people have been saying for the last half a century,” said Peter Ungar, professor of anthropology in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences.  “We have to sit back and re-evaluate what we once thought.”….   This finding represents a fundamental shift in the way researchers look at the diets of these hominins.    “This challenges the fundamental assumptions of why such specializations occur in nature,”Ungar said.  “It shows that animals can develop an extreme degree of specialization without the specialized object becoming a preferred resource.”This is indeed worrisome.  What will scientists in 2058 be overthrowing that today’s scientists will claim for the next 50 years?  Even then, who should re-evaluate the re-evaluators?Cave Cookout:  What’s more iconic than brutish cavemen and cave-women barbecuing mammoth meat over a campfire?  Better add the salad bar.  National Geographic News now says that Neanderthals ate vegetables.  The truth is in the tooth, they say.  “It seems logical to me that they took advantage of any food sources they had available in their environments, which would vary from place to place and from time to time.”  An Iraqi Neanderthal apparently liked plant food, according to its discoverers.  The claim needs a disclaimer:Henry cautions that Shanidar III is only one fossil and does not provide enough evidence to make conclusive statements about the entirety of the Neandertal diet.    “The finding suggests that characterizing Neanderthals as obligate meat-eaters may be wrong, but there is still a lot more work to be done on this issue,” Henry said.In spite of the disclaimers, the researchers claimed that by employing various methods they could get “a much more realistic picture of paleodiets.”What the Public Is ToldFundamental assumptions may continue to be overthrown, but the parade of human evolution displayed for the public marches on.  A press release described a new exhibit on human evolution by the University of Pennsylvania that offers “thought-provoking and insightful” experiences at viewing humans in the broad context of mammals.  Janet Monge and Alan Mann wrote of Darwin’s theory,This powerful theory, which appears in the news virtually every week because of the controversy surrounding it, has vast implications that affect every aspect of our lives.  As the explanatory tool of all the related fields in the biological sciences, nothing makes sense except in the light of evolutionary process.  Our new exhibit makes this point during Penn’s Year of Evolution, which celebrates Charles Darwin’s 200th birthday.If a controversy surrounds a theory 149 years old, there must be at least a few smart people who have reasons to doubt it.  One might think those controversial issues deserve be aired and addressed.  What are those controversies?  The article didn’t say.  It simply consigned all doubters to an emotional, full-immersion, multi-media re-education camp:The genesis of the idea came from Alan Mann’s realization that students seemed to understand the broad impact of evolutionary process if they could witness it for themselves in their own bodies and minds.  In order to evoke this response in the context of the exhibit, we challenge visitors to try to understand and define what it means to be human—to revel in the experience of humanness.  We ask them to witness the evolutionary process and to contextualize the human experience.  This part of the exhibit is peppered with over 200 touchable casts of both modern and extinct mammals and primates, including many of our human ancestors, our chimp relatives, and even comparisons to horses and whales.    Visitors are now ready to see evolutionary history in their own bodies.A skeptic not yet immersed in the revelry might ask whether casts of extinct and living animals necessarily demonstrate an ancestral relationship.  In addition, calling certain casts human ancestors and chimp relatives seems to beg the question that Darwin’s theory is the only or best explanation for the observations.  The parade continues without a misstep.    What evidence does the museum show forth during the controlled experience to support the broad view that humans emerged from other mammals by an undirected process of mutation and natural selection?  Some listed were: “bad backs, difficult childbirths, teeth that do not fit in our jaws, as well as many other maladies that are best understood from an evolutionary perspective.”    In other words, the authors appealed to dysteleology (bad design) – a theological issue – the assumption being that no God would design such maladies.  But if evolution is so good at adapting animals to their environments, as in whales and horses, the same charge could be leveled at the evolutionary process.  Why would not every stage of every missing link be perfectly adapted to its niche for its time?  Why would bad backs and insufficiently-sized birth canals persist for 100,000 years?  The authors did not ask such questions.  They did, however, make it clear that the “understanding of evolution” requires purposelessness: “it is not progress and it is not predictable.”    A corollary of the undirected nature of evolution is that it is not progressive and it is not complete.  This brings us back to the diet question: ““What implications do changing patterns in diet have on human health and disease?  How will human-based environmental change influence human biology and culture in the future?”  Evolution is not just about the past.  It’s what was, what is, and what will be.    The goals of this exhibit are much more expansive than the hall in which it is housed.  If the exhibit succeeds, our visitors will leave knowing that humans are part of the natural world—one species among the many mammals and primates all descended from a common ancestor—and that we are the product of the process of evolution, which has made us functional through a series of compromises, but not perfect, as can be seen in certain human ailments that may be the consequence of our evolution.  Our visitors will appreciate the many ways in which our evolutionary past defines our bodies, our minds, our culture, and our destiny.  They will understand that human societies and cultures have developed in different ways in response to specific environments around the world, but also in similar ways in response to the same basic human needs.  They will have seen that scientists are constantly searching for, finding, and interpreting evidence of the evolutionary process, and they will begin to imagine the impact of future medical and biological developments on human evolution as they join us in exploring our shared history and potential future as human animals.A major theme of the museum, stated and restated, emphasizes evolution’s practical relevance: “The evolutionary process and its outcomes have a profound impact on every aspect of our daily lives.”  The Answers in Genesis Creation Museum might agree, but with completely different assumptions, definitions, aims and conclusions.The block quote above won Stupid Evolution Quote of the Week because it begs numerous questions and is self-refuting.  Experienced readers will know why.  Just look at all the values words: aims, succeeds, knowing, compromises, perfect, appreciate, searching for, finding, interpreting evidence as if an evolved monkey brain even has access to reality, let alone any hope of knowing anything.  The aims of this exhibit exceed the capabilities of an evolved cerebrum.  Why have aims, anyway, if evolution is aimless?    Notice that the first two stories indicated major revolutions in the storytelling plot.  Mixed in with those were doubts about the ability of science in 2008 to say anything definitive about past behaviors.  As for the ailments our cave ancestors supposedly passed on to us, these have all been answered with creationary responses (e.g., Creation Magazine and Technical Journal) – as if that were even necessary.  It would be gratuitous to respond to any self-refuting proposition.    We hope the bottom line message of Year of Evolution was not lost on pastors, churchgoers, students, parents and thinking citizens.  They told you themselves that this controversial issue of human origins is not just about science, fossils and bad backs.  It has “a profound impact on every aspect of our daily lives.”  If our “potential future as human animals” is anything like that being explored today (see next entry), with no moral compass, no values and no direction, be afraid – be very afraid. (Visited 16 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Stargazer UV Hair Mascara : Awesome item. I currently have pink hair and this

first_imgBeen looking for these for years as stores discontinued. Can be used as little or as much as suits your taste. Think young girls would love this product to experiment without being permanent. Great, my daughter loved it for halloween hair – washes out easily. Stargazer UV Hair Mascara, GreenStargazer UV Hair MascaraUV ReactiveEasy to Apply ApplicatorEasily Removed with ShampooPerfect for Clubs, Parties and FestivalsMade in UKCosmetically certified formula Great, my daughter loved it for halloween hair – washes out easily. It goes on quite well and helped me decide that i did want to put in a more permanent pink streak. It’s also been great for covering up my roots as the semi permanent is growing out. These are great when you want it your way. Stargazer UV Hair Mascara, Green : Good colour and washed out easily. Exactly what i needed for daughters crazy hair day at school. This mascara is very easy to use even i can use it. Gives the desired effect, might even try another colour. Bought as a stocking filler. Easy to use, but a bit too subtle. Stargazer pink hair mascara. I have purchased this product before as i have always loved it – it brings an instant touch of bright colour to ones hair and is extremely easy to use :). Brilliant, it worked on my dark blonde/light brown hair. My hair is light brown/dark blonde. Despite reading these comments, i went ahead and ordered the pink hair mascara because i really wanted an alternative to permanent highlights. I wasn’t at all expecting miracles but as i applied the bright pink hair mascara. The front of my hair was neon pink in two strokes of the brush. That may be because my hair is very chemically damaged and so it’s quite porus and therefore will absorb colour better. However i tried it on my friends hair (dark brown in colour) and we only had to use 3 strokes before it was nearly as pink as mine. She was pleased with the result as well and will soon be buying one. I’ve not tried the uv glow because i haven’t got a uv light but i didnt buy it for that anyway. If it doesn’t work i’d suggest you keep applying coats of it. Or maybe you should get the pink one seen as i haven’t tried the other colours :d. It glowed really well under the uv lights, easy to apply, lasted all night and washed out easily as well. Looks as though it will be great, though not tried it yet. Stargazer pink hair mascara. I have purchased this product before as i have always loved it – it brings an instant touch of bright colour to ones hair and is extremely easy to use :). Bought as a stocking filler. Easy to use, but a bit too subtle. Excellent i have a very happy mum thanks and speedy delivery. Been looking for these for years as stores discontinued. Can be used as little or as much as suits your taste. Think young girls would love this product to experiment without being permanent. I currently have pink hair and this. I currently have pink hair and this is perfect for when my roots come through. I naturally have dark brown hair and it covers it with 2 strokes. Brilliant, it worked on my dark blonde/light brown hair. My hair is light brown/dark blonde. Despite reading these comments, i went ahead and ordered the pink hair mascara because i really wanted an alternative to permanent highlights. I wasn’t at all expecting miracles but as i applied the bright pink hair mascara. The front of my hair was neon pink in two strokes of the brush. That may be because my hair is very chemically damaged and so it’s quite porus and therefore will absorb colour better. However i tried it on my friends hair (dark brown in colour) and we only had to use 3 strokes before it was nearly as pink as mine. She was pleased with the result as well and will soon be buying one. I’ve not tried the uv glow because i haven’t got a uv light but i didnt buy it for that anyway. If it doesn’t work i’d suggest you keep applying coats of it. Or maybe you should get the pink one seen as i haven’t tried the other colours :d. Easy to applyi have bleach blonde hair and this washes out leavingno colour behind. I can use anytime and not worryit will not wash out. I currently have pink hair and this. I currently have pink hair and this is perfect for when my roots come through. I naturally have dark brown hair and it covers it with 2 strokes. Bought this for my daughter who has very light blonde hair. Had to apply over and over again to get a slight colour. Also had to put pressure on the hair to get the mascara to apply which made it not suitable for a child as it pulls their hair. Main plus point is that it does wash straight out. Bought this for my daughter who has very light blonde hair. Had to apply over and over again to get a slight colour. Also had to put pressure on the hair to get the mascara to apply which made it not suitable for a child as it pulls their hair. Main plus point is that it does wash straight out. SummaryReviewer Nathalie DuboisReview Date2018-03-10 11:19:50Reviewed Item Stargazer UV Hair Mascara, GreenRating 5.0 / 5  stars, based on  68  reviewsPrice£3.00last_img read more

DU admissions 2014: St Stephen’s College postpones FYUP admissions

first_imgSt. Stephen’s College, Delhi University (DU), has postponed the final admissions to the four-year undergraduate programme course following a directive from the University Grants Commission (UGC).The commission, in a notification, ordered DU that admissions for the 2014-15 academic year at the undergraduate level in general degree programmes, including honours programmes, shall be only for the three-year undergraduate programme.The three-year course was the practice prior to the introduction of the four-year undergraduate programme (FYUP).The notification stated that under no circumstances shall Delhi University or any of its colleges admit students for the four-year programme.”In view of the reported UGC directive to the Delhi University regarding its undergraduate programmes, St. Stephen’s College, while continuing with the ongoing selection process, including the publication of provisional lists of selected and wait-listed candidates for various courses, shall defer final admissions till a decision is taken on the matter by the competent authority,” said the college in a press statement.The UGC has further said that any deviation from this directive either by DU or any of the colleges under it shall be deemed to be in contravention of the UGC Act 1956, with its consequences.The statement from St. Stephen’s added: “The college will admit students only to duly approved courses. Students seeking admission to a particular course need to have definitive information about the structure and duration of the courses they join.”The ‘admission list’ being put up now is, hence, provisional. The final admission to all courses, including payment of fees, is deferred till a decision on the matter is taken by the University/the UGC.”advertisementHowever, the admission interviews as well as sports trials and interviews will continue as per the schedule already announced, said the college.”Candidates, if affected by any delay in the University/UGC taking a final decision in respect on the FYUP, shall be granted three working days for depositing their fees from the time a notice making the final admission offer is put up on the college notice board and web site,” added the statement.Being a minority institution, St. Stephens conducts its admission process separately from other colleges in DU.last_img read more